Tech billionaires need to break up with the basics and dress better

Tech billionaires need to break up with the basics and dress better

On the latest cover of fashion Australia, Snapchat co-founder Evan Spiegel is a trim example of billionaire-tech-giant dressing. Rather than being fashion forward, Spiegel’s outfit of a white T-shirt and jeans is fashion neutral, with the potential to shift into reverse.

Alongside his supermodel and beauty entrepreneur wife, Miranda Kerr, in an apron-style shirt from Fendi, Spiegel wears a normcore T-shirt from Louis Vuitton (the jeans are his own), but you can get the look for less from Just Jeans, or OshKosh b’gosh.

Snapchat co-founder Evan Spiegel wearing a Louis Vuitton T-shirt and his own jeans with wife Miranda Kerr in Fendi on the cover of Vogue Australia’s August issue.

Inside the issue, Kerr wears a fabulous floral Marine Serre sleeveless dress, a pink crushed velvet skirt from Acne and an elaborate gold Louis Vuitton dress. Spiegel sticks to the suburban barista uniform of jeans and a T-shirt.

Fellow famous members of the brainy basics club, where prints, bold colours, defined silhouettes and slogans are deleted from the wardrobe, include Facebook’s T-shirt-loving Mark Zuckerberg and Atlassian’s hoodie aficionado Mike Cannon-Brookes.

“Think Steve Jobs and his black skivvies, which partly operated as conspicuous casual, but also became a personal brand and a form of uniform,” says Chris Cheser, senior lecturer in digital cultures at the University of Sydney. “Other tech leaders opt for T-shirts.”

“This reflects the identity of youthful university-age nerdism from which many start-ups grew. It also projects the everyday-ness of consumer technology, eschewing any intimidation of expertise.”

This tech bro uniform, along with red hoodies and gray sweaters, has become as predictable in Silicon Valley circles as ping-pong tables and bean bags in IT offices, but desperately needs an update.

Meta's Mark Zuckerberg, Snap's Evan Spiegel and Atlassian's Mike Cannon-Brookes refuse to stand out from the crowd in unremarkable ensembles.

Meta’s Mark Zuckerberg, Snap’s Evan Spiegel and Atlassian’s Mike Cannon-Brookes refuse to stand out from the crowd in unremarkable ensembles.Credit:AP, Getty, Oscar Colman

Last year, fashion brands such as Gucci, Burberry and Balenciaga contributed to more than $US40 billion ($57 billion) in NFT sales globally, with a digital Glass Suit from controversial Italian designers Dolce & Gabbana selling for $US1 million in October.

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